Health

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Will I get kidney stones from alkaline water?

Posted by Bold Commerce Collaborator on

From Vitev alkaline water? No. 

When you look at recommended daily amounts of minerals like calcium and magnesium, you’ll find tables like this
one. (scroll down a bit for the table)

Let’s just use an average of 1000mg/day of calcium and 400mg/day of magnesium as a
minimum requirement.

In our testing of our reverse osmosis alkaline water based systems, because tap water is all over the place and gives an entire spectrum of results, we found approximately 70 mg of calcium and 35 mg of magnesium
per liter of water. Which means even if you drank 4 liters per day (a gallon), you are well below the minimums.

Lastly, as you read thru the National Institute of Health’s info from the link above, you’ll find this little nugget.

“For most people, other factors (such as not drinking enough fluids) probably have a larger effect on the risk of kidney stones than calcium intake.”

It seems stones are more a factor of dehydration than too many minerals. And when you understand that hydration is dependent on actually having minerals in the fluid (electrolytes), you realize the same people screaming about the dangers of kidney stones, may actually be the ones more responsible for the development.

Read more

Will I get kidney stones from alkaline water?

Posted by Bold Commerce Collaborator on

From Vitev alkaline water? No. 

When you look at recommended daily amounts of minerals like calcium and magnesium, you’ll find tables like this
one. (scroll down a bit for the table)

Let’s just use an average of 1000mg/day of calcium and 400mg/day of magnesium as a
minimum requirement.

In our testing of our reverse osmosis alkaline water based systems, because tap water is all over the place and gives an entire spectrum of results, we found approximately 70 mg of calcium and 35 mg of magnesium
per liter of water. Which means even if you drank 4 liters per day (a gallon), you are well below the minimums.

Lastly, as you read thru the National Institute of Health’s info from the link above, you’ll find this little nugget.

“For most people, other factors (such as not drinking enough fluids) probably have a larger effect on the risk of kidney stones than calcium intake.”

It seems stones are more a factor of dehydration than too many minerals. And when you understand that hydration is dependent on actually having minerals in the fluid (electrolytes), you realize the same people screaming about the dangers of kidney stones, may actually be the ones more responsible for the development.

Read more


What minerals do you use to create alkaline water?

Posted by Bold Commerce Collaborator on

Mineral quality is very important to us in creating alkaline water. Therefore we use the highest quality of ingredients we can find in the best forms available. We also have to consider which minerals provide the greatest reactivity when mixed with water and which ones produce the quickest pH and antioxidant improvement.  

We found those were Magnesium and Calcium.  

In addition, we needed some of the more subtle benefits that are much harder to measure.  Ingredients that help with how the water feels going down and interact more at the energetic level. Infrared ceramics and tourmaline fit the bill very nicely. As a nice surprise, we found they also contributed a little potassium and sodium (the good natural kind) to the water. 

After months of testing and playing with too many recipes, we came up with a couple different versions. Tap water and reverse osmosis water react with different aggressiveness. Tap water also typically has high levels of calcium already, and doesn’t need as much added.  So the FLO, UNDR and VYV use one recipe, the MAXX and REMIN are a different blend.

All work great and in the end all of our systems utilize the 4 alkaline minerals: Calcium, Magnesium, Potassium and Sodium.

Read more

What minerals do you use to create alkaline water?

Posted by Bold Commerce Collaborator on

Mineral quality is very important to us in creating alkaline water. Therefore we use the highest quality of ingredients we can find in the best forms available. We also have to consider which minerals provide the greatest reactivity when mixed with water and which ones produce the quickest pH and antioxidant improvement.  

We found those were Magnesium and Calcium.  

In addition, we needed some of the more subtle benefits that are much harder to measure.  Ingredients that help with how the water feels going down and interact more at the energetic level. Infrared ceramics and tourmaline fit the bill very nicely. As a nice surprise, we found they also contributed a little potassium and sodium (the good natural kind) to the water. 

After months of testing and playing with too many recipes, we came up with a couple different versions. Tap water and reverse osmosis water react with different aggressiveness. Tap water also typically has high levels of calcium already, and doesn’t need as much added.  So the FLO, UNDR and VYV use one recipe, the MAXX and REMIN are a different blend.

All work great and in the end all of our systems utilize the 4 alkaline minerals: Calcium, Magnesium, Potassium and Sodium.

Read more


Fluoride Perspective

Posted by Bold Commerce Collaborator on

Fluoride is an emotional and controversial topic. Many want it out of their water and many others think it adds valuable benefits. We aren’t going to tackle that discussion right now, we just want to help direct you towards options for whatever side of the discussion you find yourself on.

We also want to make sure you are aware of some common misconceptions and things we didn’t even realize until talking with the experts who make the filtration media.  It wasn’t a fun experience.

For more info, this page will go into greater detail and give insight into how we deal with it across the Vitev product line.

Read more

Fluoride Perspective

Posted by Bold Commerce Collaborator on

Fluoride is an emotional and controversial topic. Many want it out of their water and many others think it adds valuable benefits. We aren’t going to tackle that discussion right now, we just want to help direct you towards options for whatever side of the discussion you find yourself on.

We also want to make sure you are aware of some common misconceptions and things we didn’t even realize until talking with the experts who make the filtration media.  It wasn’t a fun experience.

For more info, this page will go into greater detail and give insight into how we deal with it across the Vitev product line.

Read more


ORP…think positive and drink negative

Posted by Bold Commerce Collaborator on

One of the most significant benefits of our water is something called ORP.  It stands for Oxidation Reduction Potential and is actually a bit easier to understand if you reverse the order of those words.

Essentially, it’s a way to measure a liquid’s Potential to Reduce Oxidation.

Oxidation in the human body is seen at the cellular level.  It’s a deteriorating process that takes the cell from healthy and vibrant to weakened and lifeless.  Think of patio furniture or an old Chevy truck left out in the elements. Anywhere there is a nick in the protective paint, oxidation takes over and they begin to rust.  

Same idea with our cells.  

ORP is not a new discovery.  It’s been around for a long time and can be used as a way to check the status of public pools and municipal water supplies.  Positive (+) numbers tell the tester that the water will destroy living organisms.  

Which as we all agree, is very important for a public pool and one more reason to tell the kids not to drink pool water.

But we don’t want to drink something that destroys living organisms.  Instead we look for a negative (-) ORP. 

Something all our natural alkaline water systems create.

Read more

ORP…think positive and drink negative

Posted by Bold Commerce Collaborator on

One of the most significant benefits of our water is something called ORP.  It stands for Oxidation Reduction Potential and is actually a bit easier to understand if you reverse the order of those words.

Essentially, it’s a way to measure a liquid’s Potential to Reduce Oxidation.

Oxidation in the human body is seen at the cellular level.  It’s a deteriorating process that takes the cell from healthy and vibrant to weakened and lifeless.  Think of patio furniture or an old Chevy truck left out in the elements. Anywhere there is a nick in the protective paint, oxidation takes over and they begin to rust.  

Same idea with our cells.  

ORP is not a new discovery.  It’s been around for a long time and can be used as a way to check the status of public pools and municipal water supplies.  Positive (+) numbers tell the tester that the water will destroy living organisms.  

Which as we all agree, is very important for a public pool and one more reason to tell the kids not to drink pool water.

But we don’t want to drink something that destroys living organisms.  Instead we look for a negative (-) ORP. 

Something all our natural alkaline water systems create.

Read more


Milk – Does it do a body good?

Posted by Bold Commerce Collaborator on

Late last year, a study came out drawing conclusions on some of the health benefits typically associated with drinking milk.  Things we constantly hear like “builds strong bones and teeth”.

This wasn’t just a small scale study either.  The average length of observation was just over 20 years and more than 105,000 Swedes participated.  You can read the entire abstract, methods and conclusions here.

Or in the sake of time…a few highlights from the study.

“For every glass of milk in women no reduction was observed in fracture risk with higher milk consumption for any fracture … “

“a positive association was seen between milk intake and both urine 8-iso-PGF2α (a biomarker of oxidative stress) and serum interleukin 6 (a main inflammatory biomarker).

“Because of the high content of lactose in milk, we hypothesised that high consumption of milk may increase oxidative stress, which in turn affects the risk of mortality and fracture. “

“Particularly noteworthy is that intake of fermented milk products such as yogurt and soured milk and cheese were associated with lower rates of fracture and mortality. Furthermore, we observed a positive association only between milk intake and markers of oxidative stress (urine 8-iso-PGF2α) and inflammation (serum interleukin 6). “

Just a bit concerning isn’t it?

There are some caveats and they hesitate from using this study as the sole reason for nutritional guidance.  But at the same time, if what the popular guidance says is true, then should any of those very negative and conflicting results even be occurring?

The list of milk alternatives is growing and the number of things we can eat to replenish our calcium supplies is the best we’ve ever had.  Just something to consider the next time you hit the supermarket.

Full transparency, while we have lowered our milk intake drastically since going more alkaline years ago, there still isn’t anything better with cookies.

Read more

Milk – Does it do a body good?

Posted by Bold Commerce Collaborator on

Late last year, a study came out drawing conclusions on some of the health benefits typically associated with drinking milk.  Things we constantly hear like “builds strong bones and teeth”.

This wasn’t just a small scale study either.  The average length of observation was just over 20 years and more than 105,000 Swedes participated.  You can read the entire abstract, methods and conclusions here.

Or in the sake of time…a few highlights from the study.

“For every glass of milk in women no reduction was observed in fracture risk with higher milk consumption for any fracture … “

“a positive association was seen between milk intake and both urine 8-iso-PGF2α (a biomarker of oxidative stress) and serum interleukin 6 (a main inflammatory biomarker).

“Because of the high content of lactose in milk, we hypothesised that high consumption of milk may increase oxidative stress, which in turn affects the risk of mortality and fracture. “

“Particularly noteworthy is that intake of fermented milk products such as yogurt and soured milk and cheese were associated with lower rates of fracture and mortality. Furthermore, we observed a positive association only between milk intake and markers of oxidative stress (urine 8-iso-PGF2α) and inflammation (serum interleukin 6). “

Just a bit concerning isn’t it?

There are some caveats and they hesitate from using this study as the sole reason for nutritional guidance.  But at the same time, if what the popular guidance says is true, then should any of those very negative and conflicting results even be occurring?

The list of milk alternatives is growing and the number of things we can eat to replenish our calcium supplies is the best we’ve ever had.  Just something to consider the next time you hit the supermarket.

Full transparency, while we have lowered our milk intake drastically since going more alkaline years ago, there still isn’t anything better with cookies.

Read more